Monday, June 11, 2007

Frightening horror news

Is the horror boom over? (NY Times)

4 comments:

Mark said...

Given the relatively low costs of production it's very easy for a studio to recoup it's money on a horror film. I find the genre interesting - up to a point - because there is the weird synergy of uncompromising aritistic integrity and capitalism at work. I'm not a big fan of seventies or the Saw/Hostel horror, but films like Return of the Living Dead or the Evil Dead trilogy are nice little examples of what can be accomplished with a shoestring budget and a tight script.

Mark said...

Whoops! Speaking more to your post, while I wouldn't be surprised if horror films don't have quite as high a profile for a while, unfortunately, we're probably going to see lots of Hostel type horror until Eli Roth et al are supplanted by a group of directors raised on mid-eighties-early nineties stuff. Unfortunately, economics/generational factors are at play here...

I guess what I find odd is Roth and I are of roughly the same age, so I would have thought slapstick, a la Creepshow, Re-Animator, Evil Dead, and Return of the Living Dead would have been more of an influence rather than that really ugly seventies stuff, which is a little bit before our time.

Simon Crowe said...

There will always be an audience for horror films, I rarely review them because there are certain rules people expect and I don't know what they are....As usual, Hollywood has produced too many in too short a time...

Mark said...

You probably know I'm a pretty big structure guy, and that's what I love about some of those cult horror films - the basic structure you'd use for any other genre is observed very carefully. Get your monkey up a tree, throw rocks at the monkey, get the monkey out of the tree.

I was listening to the ROTD commentary, and apparently the rules for shots and angles on a horror film can be quite demanding.

From what I can tell, tighter is better in a horror film. One thing that I couldn't stand about 28 Weeks Later, but what made it so effective, was the digital camera.

It really gets in the viewers face, and under your skin. The daylight can look pretty scary with a digital camera, and usually to achieve that sort of spooky you need twilight...